Dustin Wheeler

Dustin Wheeler
Dustin is a technology-driven CPA in Orem, Utah.

Social Media

Follow me on Twitter

Are Bank Import Features Driving Reconciliations to Extinction?

I guess I’m an “old school” guy when it comes to accounting for my personal finances. I enter transactions into QuickBooks in real time.  Whenever I write a check or pay a bill online, they immediately go into QuickBooks.  I save all of my receipts, put them in a folder, and enter them in batches at least once a week.  These are important processes for me because I am always aware of the amount of cash I have available despite …

Continue reading Are Bank Import Features Driving Reconciliations to Extinction?

A Refund from my Overfunded Escrow Account

Image via Wikipedia

As I wrote in an earlier post, I use QuickBooks to organize my household finances.  Like every good accountant, I am detail oriented and keep meticulous records.  I keep every receipt, reconcile each of my accounts monthly, and split the expense categorization of grocery bills between food, cleaning and baby products (OK, just kidding on the last one).

One transaction that I do split out every month is my mortgage payment.  My mortgage payments are made up of three …

Continue reading A Refund from my Overfunded Escrow Account

The Importance of Accountability in a Personal Budget

Many years ago, I was involved in an organization in which I and other volunteers received a weekly allowance to cover various expenses such as transportation and meals.  In one of our meetings, the president of the organization announced that some of the volunteers had come to him and complained that the allowance wasn’t sufficient to cover the expenses (I was not one of them).  He told us that he would consider increasing the amount of the allowance for those …

Continue reading The Importance of Accountability in a Personal Budget

My First Lessons about Debt Came from a Video Game

When I was fifteen, I played a computer game that simulates building and operating an amusement park.  The object of the game is to make money by thrilling patrons on the rides, taking care of their basic needs (extra sugar in the sodas), and making them happy enough to empty their pockets on souvenirs.

The game begins with enough cash to build a park, but it is all debt financed.

The first time I played the game, I paid little attention to …

Continue reading My First Lessons about Managing Debt Came from a Video Game